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01/01/13 - 06/01/13

A weekly feature bringing you the highlights of any interesting or unusual photos/movements from the week just gone.
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Flyingmonster
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Posts: 13588
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: Skipton, North Yorkshire

01/01/13 - 06/01/13

Post by Flyingmonster » Mon Jan 07, 2013 2:09 am

This Weeks Highlights -
01/01/13 - 06/01/13

Aircraft - Boeing C40B Clipper
Serial - 01-0041 (C/N 3308/1089)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 1st Airlift Squadron/89th Airlift Wing
Date and Location - 04/01 - Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information

The Aircraft is one of 10 the USAF have in service (4 x B Versions and 6 x C Versions) in the VIP/Passenger Aircraft. The Boeing C-40 Clipper is a military version of the Boeing 737-700C airline transport. It is used by both the United States Navy and the United States Air Force. The United States Air Force selected the C-40B to replace the aging fleet of C-137 aircraft for U.S. combatant commanders. The C40C is the United States Air Force version of the Boeing 737-700 based Boeing Business Jet modified as a special mission aircraft for commanders and government officials and operate all four built. The Air Force awarded the medium lift contract in August 2000 and the first was delivered to the 89th Airlift Wing in December 2002. The cabin area is equipped with a crew rest area, distinguished visitor compartment with sleep accommodations, two galleys and business class seating with worktables and is operated by a crew of 5 (two pilots, one crew chief, one loadmaster and one transport safety specialist). The aircraft has 3 different transport capacites ( Passenger configuration: 121 passengers, Cargo configuration: 8 pallets of cargo and the Combination configuration: 3 pallets of cargo, 70 passengers) over a range of 3,000 nm. The C-40B is designed to be an "office in the sky" for senior military and government leaders. Communications are paramount aboard the C-40B which provides broadband data/video transmit and receive capability as well as clear and secure voice and data communication. It gives combatant commanders the ability to conduct business anywhere around the world using on-board Internet and local area network connections, improved telephones, satellites, television monitors, and facsimile and copy machines. The C-40B also has a computer-based passenger data system. Operated by the 1st AS based out of Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, the aircraft is used to transport various high-level U.S. military and government officials under their Mission goal of 'Providing global Special Air Mission (SAM) airlift, logistics, aerial port and communications for the President, Vice President, Combat Commanders, senior leaders and the global mobility system as tasked by the White House, Chief of Staff of the Air Force, and Air Mobility Command'. Established under Air Transport Command in 1944, the unit currently operates the C-12 Huron (1977 – Present) and the C-32A (June 1998–Present) as well as the C40B (2002 - Present).

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Photojet
Aircraft - Airbus Voyager KC2
Serial - ZZ330 (C/N 1046/MRTT017)
Operator - Royal Air Force (RAF) (Air Tanker) Squadron - N/a
Date and Location - 04/01 Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information

The RAF currently have 14 (7 x KC2, 5 x KC3 + 2 fitted for KC3) of the type on order to take over the Strategic Transport and Aerial Refueling Role from the services ageing TriStars and VC10s. The A330 MRTT has been ordered by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), Royal Air Force (RAF), United Arab Emirates Air Force, and Royal Saudi Air Force. The EADS/Northrop Grumman KC-45 was a version of the A330 MRTT proposed for the United States Air Force. The A330 MRTT is a military derivative of the Airbus A330-200 airliner. It is designed as a dual-role air-to-air refuelling and transport aircraft. For air-to-air refuelling missions the A330 MRTT can be equipped with a combination of any of the following systems: Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft, Cobham 805E Fuselage Refuelling Unit (FRU) for probe-equipped receiver aircraft or the Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) for self in-flight refuelling. In January 2004 the UK Ministry of Defence announced that a variant of the A330 MRTT had been selected to provide tanking service for the RAF for the next 30 years under the Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft (FSTA) programme, replacing the RAF's existing L-1011 and VC10 tankers. The UK Ministry of Defence signed a deal to lease 14 aircraft under a private finance initiative arrangement from EADS-led consortium AirTanker, with the first aircraft to enter service in 2012. There are two versions, designated Voyager KC2 and Voyager KC3 the former will be fitted with two Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods, the latter with a Cobham 805E Fuselage Refuelling Unit (FRU) in addition to the under-wing pods. None of the RAF aircraft will be fitted with the Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS). The fleet is to be based at RAF Brize Norton and will be powered by Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines. Crewed by 2 pilots and 1 AAR operator, the aircraft will have a range of 14,800 km and a ceiling height of 41,500 ft. 10 Squadron is due to stand up and Operate the type.

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Watson
Aircraft - Beechcraft RC12X 'Guardrail'
Serial - 92-13122 (C/N FE-2B)
Operator - US Army (Aviation) Squadron - 1st MI Bn/Co B
Date and Location - 04/01 Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information

The Aircraft is one of 18 the US Army operate in the Intelligence Gathering role. Based on the C12 Huron the aircraft is operated by a crew of 2 and incorporates the Guardrail V system. The systems on board the aircraft are controlled from a ground unit or station and was acquired in 1991. The RC-12X Guardrail is an airborne SIGINT sensor and ground processing system that provides the brigade combat teams with instant precision geo-location and identification of threats. The X variant of the type is a modernised version of the K variant. The RC-12X Guardrail modernisation programme is intended to extend the life of the aircraft until 2025 with new payloads added to the system to better sense and exploit emerging, irregular and conventional warfare threats. The US have 14 of the X version ordered with thethe first delivered to the US Army in January 2011. The 1 MIB (Military Inteligence Battalion) also known as the "Flying Eye Battalion" . The unit is based at Wiesbaden in Germany and comprises 4 companies – HHSC (Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company) - Runs battalion command and control and provides logistics support, A Company - Provides aerial images through the use of the Hunter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, B Company - Produces SIGINT collection and Aerial Electronic Warfare with the Guardrail Common Sensor, and C Company - Conducts analysis and dissemination of SIGINT. The intelligence unit supports US military activity in Afghanistan and other US Operations and interests. The unit is one which specializes in the acquisition of aerial signals information in direct support of the 66th Military Intelligence Brigade. The unit was originally formed on 14 December 1956 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 1st Air Reconnaissance Support Battalion. 1st MI Battalion has served in Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm, Operation Joint Endeavor as well as Afghanistan and Iraq.

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Watson
Aircraft - Westland Sea King HAR3
Serial - XZ585/A (C/N WA851)
Operator - Royal Air Force (RAF) Squadron - 202/D Flt
Date and Location - 04/01 - RAF Lossiemouth (EGQS)

Further Information

The aircraft is one of 25 (19 HAR3 and 6 HAR3A) of the type in the SAR Role. The Westland WS-61 Sea King is a British licence-built version of the American Sikorsky S-61 helicopter of the same name, built by Westland Helicopters. The aircraft differs considerably from the American version, with Rolls-Royce Gnome engines. The HAR3 version of the Sea King is fitted with a relocated rear cabin bulkhead giving greater cabin length, extra fuel capacity and additional observation windows. The aircraft is a dedicated search and rescue (SAR) version of the Sea King and was developed for the RAF Search and Rescue Force. The aircraft, designated the HAR3, was introduced into RAF Service in 1978 to replace the Westland Whirlwind HAR.10. Up until 1992 19 of the type were in service until six further helicopters were ordered to replace the last remaining Westland Wessex helicopters in the SAR role, entering service in 1996 (Designated the HAR3A). The six Sea King HAR3As featured updated systems, including a digital navigation system and more modern avionics. 12 HAR3/3As were dispersed across the UK, a further two HAR3s were attached to the Falkland Islands, providing 24-hour rescue coverage. Some Royal Navy HAS5 ASW variants were adapted for the SAR role and served with 771 Naval Air Squadron, Culdrose and HMS Gannet SAR Flight at Prestwick Airport in Scotland and are expected to remain in service until 2018. 202 Squadron presently operates the Sea King HAR.3/A in the Search and rescue role at three stations in the northern half of the United Kingdom. It was originally formed as one of the first aeroplane squadrons of the RNAS before it became part of the RAF. The squadron began operating in its search and rescue role using the Westland Whirlwind HAR.10 helicopter. The primary role of RAF search and rescue is the recovery of downed military aviators, but in peacetime its aircraft are available all year round for use in civilian distress incidents. Since 1973, over 95% of the rescues carried out by 202 Squadron have been civilian incidents. The rescues carried out over the years by 202 Squadron have included a wide variety of incidents involving rescuing casualties from aircraft, fishing trawlers, ferries, oil rigs, mountainous terrain, cliffs and the waters surrounding Scotland. The squadron usually has two aircraft at each of its detached flight locations with their HQ at RAF Valley and aircraft detached to 'A' Flight at RAF Boulmer, 'D' Flight at RAF Lossiemouth and 'E' Flight at RAF Leconfield also. The squadron maintains a 15-minutes readiness state during daylight hours and a 45-minutes readiness state during the hours of darkness. The Search and Rescue fleet of Sea Kings are fitted with a video/infrared detection pod, which is similar to the equipment used by police helicopters, to help search for casualties.

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Onemac
Aircraft - Boeing C17 Globemaster III (ER)
Serial - ZZ176 (C/N F-190/UK6)
Operator - Royal Air Force (RAF) Squadron - 99 Squadron
Date and Location - 04/01 - RAF Brize Norton (EGVN)

Further Information

One of 8 Aircraft the RAF have in the tactical Transport Role and are unofficially known as the C17 'ER'. This is due to the fact they operate C-17As with extended range due to the addition of the center wing tank. This upgrade was incorporated in production beginning in 2001 with Block 13 aircraft. The Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is a large military transport aircraft. It was developed for the United States Air Force (USAF) from the 1980s to the early 1990s by McDonnell Douglas; the company later merged with Boeing. The C-17 is used for rapid strategic airlift of troops and cargo to main operating bases or forward operating bases throughout the world. It can also perform tactical airlift, medical evacuation and airdrop missions. The C-17 carries the name of two previous, but unrelated piston-engine, U.S. military cargo aircraft, the Douglas C-74 Globemaster and the Douglas C-124 Globemaster II. In addition to the U.S. Air Force, the C-17 is operated by the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and NATO Heavy Airlift Wing. Additionally, India has ordered C-17s. The first C-17 was delivered to the RAF at Boeing's Long Beach facility on 17 May 2001 and flown to RAF Brize Norton by a crew from No. 99 Squadron which had previously trained with USAF crews to gain competence on the type. No. 99 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was a bomber squadron in both first and second world war. At present it operates the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III from RAF Brize Norton, the RAF's air transport hub. The squadron was the first RAF unit to receive the Avro Aldershot, Handley Page Hyderabad, Handley Page Hinaidi, Vickers Wellington, Bristol Britannia and Boeing Globemaster. In case of the Avro Aldershot the squadron even was its only operator as it is now for the Globemasters. One of the first high profile missions of the squadron was the deployment of Lynx helicopters and support equipment to Macedonia as part of a NATO peacekeeping force. This deployment was codenamed Operation Bessemer.

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467Squadron
Aircraft - Boeing E3A AWACS
Serial - LX-N90453 (C/N 22848/964))
Operator - NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)Squadron - NAEW&CF
Date and Location - 03/01 - RAF Mildenhall (EGUN)

Further Information

The Boeing E-3 Sentry is an airborne early warning and control (AWACS) developed by Boeing as the prime contractor. Derived from the Boeing 707, it provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications.The E-3 is distinguished by the distinctive rotating radar dome above the fuselage. Production ended in 1992 after 68 aircraft were built. AWACS’s are used by the United States Air Force (USAF),NATO, Royal Air Force (RAF), French Air Force (FAF) and Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) utilising the 68 aircraft that were built.The aircraft are operated by a NATO element Based at NATO Air Base Geilenkirchen, the E-3A program is made up from 17 of NATO's nations and is one of two operational elements of the NATO Airborne Early Warning & Control Force. The second component is made up by the E3Ds at RAF Waddington. The E3A component operates 17 E3A that are normally operating from Forward operating bases in Greece, Italy, Turkey and Norway aswell as Geilenkirchen. A similar program has been set up with the C17 Globemaster III's operated by NATO. The Program celebrated it 30th Anniversary on 24 February. February 24th 1982 saw the first E-3A AWACS aircraft land at NATO Air Base Geilenkirchen, marking the start of a new era in airspace surveillance. Since that time, these aircraft have countless missions from the base in support of all NATO Operations and Campaigns since there induction. The Component consists of five main functional areas: the Operations Wing, Logistics Wing, Training Wing, Information Technology Wing and Headquarters as well as other normal staff functions. It is NATO’s first multinational operational flying unit, making it unique in military history. The Component’s mission is to provide aircraft and trained aircrews to deliver a surveillance and/or control platform whenever directed by the NATO Airborne Early Warning & Control Force Commander on behalf of the NATO commander, The Supreme Allied Commander, Europe (SACEUR). During Operation Desert Storm, E-3s flew 379 missions and logged 5,052 hours of on-station time. E-3 controllers assisted in 38 of the 41 air-to-air kills recorded during the conflict. NATO and RAF E-3s also participated in the international military operation in Libya.

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Macbhx
Aircraft - Lockheed C130H Hercules
Serial - 93-1041 (C/N 382-5376)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF)Squadron - 50th AS
Date and Location - 03/01 - RAF Mildenhall (EGUN)

Further Information

One of 283 H variants of the C130 is USAF Service used in the Tactical Airlift role. The H version is the basic airlifter variant of the type. The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop military transport aircraft designed and built originally by Lockheed, now Lockheed Martin. Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a troop, medical evacuation, and cargo transport aircraft. The versatile airframe has found uses in a variety of other roles, including as a gunship (AC-130), for airborne assault, search and rescue, scientific research support, weather reconnaissance, aerial refueling, maritime patrol and aerial firefighting. It is now the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. Over 40 models and variants of the Hercules serve with more than 60 nations. The C-130 entered service with U.S. in the 1950s, followed by Australia and others. During its years of service, the Hercules family has participated in countless military, civilian and humanitarian aid operations. The family has the longest continuous production run of any military aircraft in history. In 2007, the C-130 became the fifth aircraft—after the English Electric Canberra, Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, Tupolev Tu-95, and Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker—to mark 50 years of continuous use with its original primary customer, in this case, the United States Air Force. The C-130 is also the only military aircraft to remain in continuous production for 50 years with its original customer, as the updated C-130J Super Hercules. The 50th Airlift Squadron is one of four operational flying Air Mobility Command squadrons currently stationed at Little Rock AFB in Jacksonville, Arkansas. The "Fightin' 5-0 along with their sister squadrons, the 41 AS, 53 AS, and the 61 AS, are assigned to the 19th Operations Group. The Unit have been operating the type since 1957 and in 2012 elements of the 50th celebrated 70 years of history with members deployed to the 774th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron in Afghanistan. Reactivated in 1957 by TAC as one of the first C-130 Hercules squadrons when the aircraft came into operational service. The squadron has been involved in major engagements around the world to include the Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War, and the current Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).

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Macbhx
Thanks for looking and heres to a succesfull and varied 2013 in the world of Aviation!

:thumb: :thumb:
Cheers

Boo boo (aka Jamie)

'The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down!' - Yeager

venom
Posts: 8237
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Re: 01/01/13 - 06/01/13

Post by venom » Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:35 pm

very nice photos jamie its apity voyager cant come to leuchers for a couple of missed aproaches hopeing to get down to prestwick sometimine this year

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