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14/10 - 21/10

A weekly feature bringing you the highlights of any interesting or unusual photos/movements from the week just gone.
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Flyingmonster
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Posts: 13589
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: Skipton, North Yorkshire

14/10 - 21/10

Post by Flyingmonster » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:26 pm

This Weeks Highlights
14/10 - 21/10

Aircraft - Lockheed HC-130N Hercules
Serial - 90-2103 (C/N 382-5294)
92-2104 (C/N 382-5381)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - Alaskan Air Guard/211th RQS
Date and Location - 14/10 - Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information


The aircraft is one of 35 (10 x HC130N, 23 x HC130P and 2 x HC130J) search and rescue variants of the Hercules on strength with the USAF. Based on the C130, the HC130 (Known as the Combat King) is an extended-range, search and rescue (SAR) and Combat search and rescue (CSAR) version of the C130. The aircraft can also be used to execute on scene CSAR command and control, airdrop pararescue forces and equipment, and are also capable of providing air refueling to appropriately equipped helicopters in flight. In this latter role, they are primarily used to extend the range and endurance of combat search and rescue helicopters. The type can fly in the day against a reduced threat; however, crews normally fly night, low-level, air refueling and airdrop operations using night vision goggles (NVG). The aircraft can routinely fly low-level NVG tactical flight profiles to avoid detection, and to enhance the probability of mission success and survivability near populated areas, crews employ tactics that include incorporating no external lighting or communications, and avoiding radar and weapons detection. The N version of the type is a rescue version of the C-130E/H, similar to the H version but without the Fulton surface-to-air recovery system. All version of the aircraft are to be replaced by the HC130J Combat King II variant in the near future. The aircraft has modifications for in-flight refueling of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft, including refueling pods on underwing pylons and additional internal fuel tanks in the cargo bay. The HC-130J Combat King II is also capable of itself being refueled in flight by boom-equipped tankers and first flew on the 29th July 2010. The 211th are the busiest rescue force in the Department of Defense, the 212th Rescue Squadron provides elite pararescuemen (PJs), combat rescue officers (CROs) and Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) specialists to carry out the 176th Wing's wartime and peacetime rescue missions. Previously under the command of the 210th (all elements of the 176th Wing's rescue package: helicopters, fixed-wing aircraft and the rescuers themselves were undder this command), the unit changed in 2004, when the 210th was split into the 210th, 211th and 212th rescue squadrons. The 210th kept the eight HH-60 Pavehawk search-and-rescue helicopters; the 211th now flies four HC-130 search-and-rescue aircraft. All 3 elements of the wing work together to carry out rescue and training missions.

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Watson
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Watson
Aircraft - Fairchild Republic A-10A Thunderbolt II
Serial - 81-0981/SP (C/N A10-0676)
81-0985/SP (C/N A10-0680 )
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 52nd Wing/81st Fighter Squadron
Date and Location - 18/10 - Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (EDFH)

Further Information

The Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II is an American single-seat, twin-engine, straight-wing jet aircraft developed by Fairchild-Republic in the early 1970s. The A-10 was designed for a United States Air Force requirement to provide close air support (CAS) for ground forces by attacking tanks, armored vehicles, and other ground targets with a limited air interdiction capability. It is the first U.S. Air Force aircraft designed solely for close air support. Designed around the GAU-8 Avenger, a heavy rotary cannon which forms the aircraft's primary armament (and is, to date, the heaviest rotary cannon ever mounted on an aircraft). The A-10's official name comes from the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt of World War II, a fighter that was particularly effective at close air support. The A-10 is more commonly known by its nickname "Warthog" or simply "Hog". The A-10 is not expected to be replaced until 2028 or later. The A-10 is exceptionally tough. Its strong airframe can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high-explosive projectiles up to 23 mm. The aircraft has triple redundancy in its flight systems, with mechanical systems to back up double-redundant hydraulic systems. This permits pilots to fly and land when hydraulic power or part of a wing is lost. Proof of the durability of the A-10 was shown when Captain Kim Campbell, flying a ground support mission over Baghdad during the 2003 invasion of Iraq on 7 April, suffered extensive flak damage to her A-10. Iraqi fire damaged one of the A-10's engines and crippled its hydraulic system, which required the aircraft's stabilizer and flight controls to be operated via the back-up mechanical system, this being known as 'manual reversion mode'. Despite this damage, Campbell managed to fly the aircraft for nearly an hour and landed safely. Flown by a crew of 1, the aircraft has a Max takeoff weight of 50,000 lb and a ranged of some 2,240 nmi. The Type has been used extensively by the USAF (The Sole operator of the type) in the Gulf War, Balkans, Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. The A-10 was used in combat for the first time during the Gulf War in 1991, destroying more than 900 Iraqi tanks, 2,000 military vehicles, and 1,200 artillery pieces. A-10s shot down two Iraqi helicopters with the GAU-8 cannon. The first of these was an Iraqi helicopter shot down by Captain Robert Swain over Kuwait on 6 February 1991, marking the A-10's first air-to-air victory. The 81st Fighter Squadron (81 FS) is part of the 52d Fighter Wing at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. It operates the A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft conducting close air support missions. The Unit have been operating the type since 1994.

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The EDI Guy
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The EDI Guy
Aircraft - Embraer ERJ135BJ Legacy 600
Serial - HP-1A (C/N 14501066)
Operator - Panamainian Air Force (Servicio Nacional Aeronaval (SENAN)) Squadron - Escuadrilla Presidencial
Date and Location - 17/10 - Frankfurt am Main Airport (EDDF)

Further Information

The ERJ-135 is a 3,148km range, 37-passenger airliner and a member of the Embraer regional jet series. The launch of the aircraft was in 1997 and the first flight was carried out in July 1998. Certification from the Brazilian Centro Tecnico Aerospacial (CTA), the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the European Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) was awarded in 1999. The aircraft entered into service with Continental Express and American Eagle in July 1999. Approximately 132 ERJ-135 regional jets have been ordered for operators including British Midland, Chautauqua Airlines, City Airlines, Flandre Air, Jetmagic, Luxair, Proteus and South African Air Link. The Legacy 600 variant of the type is the Business jet variant based on the ERJ 135. Powered by 2 Rolls-Royce AE 3007-A1, the aircraft is the only one of its type in Panamainian service in the VIP/Presidential Transport Role. Operated by the Escuadrilla Presidencial based at Panama/Marcos A. Gelabert airport along with the Units 2 S-76C's (Used in the same role). The SENAN curretly have some 40 odd aircraft on strength to support the Country with law enforcement, and can perform limited military actions. Panama can create a temporary military force to counter any attack if the need arises. The main tasks of the current SENAN is to support the national administration in cases of natural disasters, monitoring the extensive coastlines and borders, particularly the Colombian border area - the so called Darien Gap - which is notorious for its presence of guerrillas and narcotraffic.The SAN merged with its maritime counterpart to become the Servicio Nacional Aeronaval (SENAN) in November 2008. The rest of the countries aviation assets are based at Tocumen Airport.

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The EDI Guy
Aircraft - Lockheed U2R/S 'Dragon Lady'
Serial - 80-1079 (C/N 079)
80-1093 (C/N 093)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 99th RS
Date and Location - 20/10 - RAF Fairford (EGVA)

Further Information

The Dragon Lady is a single-engine, very high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft operated by the United States Air Force (USAF) and previously flown by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The U-2 remains in frontline service more than 50 years after its first flight despite the advent of surveillance satellites. The U-2 has outlasted its Mach 3 SR-71 replacement, which was retired in 1998. The USAF have 25 of the type in service in the Reconnaissance Role. Operated by the 99th RS under the command of the 9th RW based at Beale AFB, the Dragon Lady is used to fly reconnaissance missions around the world.The 99th Reconnaissance Squadron is responsible for providing critical intelligence for use by the highest levels of the US government as well as flying humanitarian, search and rescue and environmental missions. Pilots on the Squadron fly the Lockheed U-2S to continuously train to upgrade from a normal aircraft commander status to that of instructor pilot status.Operating the U2 since 1976, the unit have flown operational missions including extensive reconnaissance efforts during Operations Urgent Fury, Just Cause, Desert Shield, Desert Storm and operation Iraqi Freedom as well as humanitarian efforts covering wildfire and earthquake damage in California and Midwestern United States floods. 99 RS personnel are currently temporarily assigned to four overseas detachments. Capable of flying at 70,000 feet, the all weather capable jet is expected to carry on in US service until 2023. The U-2R, first flown in 1967, is significantly larger and more capable than the original aircraft. A tactical reconnaissance version, the TR-1A, first flew in August 1981. A distinguishing feature of these aircraft is the addition of a large instrumentation "superpod" under each wing. Designed for standoff tactical reconnaissance in Europe, the TR-1A was structurally identical to the U-2R. The two-seat trainer variant of the TR-1, the TR-1B, was redesignated as the TU-2R. After upgrading with the F-118-101 engine, the former U-2Rs were designated the U-2S Senior Year.

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MikeB
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Gundylunch
Aircraft - Boeing 757-200
Serial - NZ7571 (C/N26633/519)
Operator - Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF)
Date and Location - 20/10 Malta International Airport (LMML)

Further Information -

Operated by 40 Squadron (Ki Nga Hau e Wha) based at Whenuapai under the command of the Air Component Command. The aircraft is one of 2 operated in the Strategic Air Transport Role and were were purchased from Transavia to replace the Boeing 727 used in the same role in 2003. The Squadron is also responsible for the operation of the Services C130H Hercules. It was formed from New Zealand components of the British Royal Air Force, becoming an independent force in 1923, although many RNZAF aircrew continued to serve in the Royal Air Force until the end of the 1940s. In 2001 the government decided the Air Force had to withdraw its Air Combat fleet. As a result, all A-4 Skyhawks and MB339s were withdrawn from active duty on 13 December 2001. This leaves the service at the start of 2006 with a maritime squadron flying Orions, a transport squadron with C-130s and B757s, a helicopter squadron operating Hueys and Bell 47s, a maritime rotor squadron operating the SH-2Gs, a multi-engine conversion squadron with Beech 200s and a Flying and Pilot training school with leased Airtrainers.

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MBO570
Aircraft - Boeing KC-767-200ER MRTT 'Jupiter'
Serial - FAC1202 (C/N 24157/253)
Operator - Columbian Air Force (Fuerza Aérea Colombiana (FAC)) Squadron - ESCTA 811
Date and Location - 17/10 - Oslo Airport - Gardermoen (ENGM)

Further Information

The Boeing KC-767 is a military aerial refueling and strategic transport aircraft developed from the Boeing 767-200ER and received the designation KC-767A in 2002. The tanker has been developed for the Italian and Japanese air forces, who ordered four tankers each. Financing of the development of the aircraft has largely been borne by Boeing, in the hope of receiving major orders from the U.S. Air Force. Boeing's revised KC-767 proposal to the U.S. Air Force was selected in February 2011 for the KC-X program under the designation KC-46. The aircraft is fitted with boom and hose-drogue refueling systems on the centerline with hose-drogue wingpod systems.The aircraft are initially built as 767-200ER commercial airplanes, then flown to a separate facility for conversion into tankers. The aircraft is the only one on strength with the Columbian Air Force in the Aeiral Tanking role. Operated by Escuadrón de Transporte 811, based at El Dorado, Bogotà , the unit come under the command of Grupo de Transporte Aéreo 81. The Unit is also responsible for the FAC's B727-151C, C-130B, C-130H, C-130H-1, C295M, CN235M-100 and KC-137. First flying on 21st May 2005, the aircarft was used in its its first hookup with a receiver aircraft, a B-52 Stratofortress, on 23rd January 2007. The "dry contact" transferred no fuel, but was intended to test the tanker's fifth-generation fly-by-wire telescoping boom. Unlike the KC-135 boom operator, who is prone, the KC-767 operator uses a remote station with a video display. The testing is being done at Edwards Air Force Base, and the test aircraft is destined for Italy once testing is complete. The Colombian Air Force or FAC (Spanish: Fuerza Aérea Colombiana) is the Air Force of the Republic of Colombia. The Colombian Air Force (FAC) is one of the three institutions of the Armed Forces of Colombia, charge according to the 1991 Constitution of the work to exercise and maintain control of Colombia's airspace to defend the sovereignty, territorial integrity and constitutional order. It is one of the largest Latin American air forces and increased activity due to its important role in the fight against narco-terrorism.

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Fen
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Fen
Aircraft - Airbus Voyager KC2
Serial - MRTT018 (ZZ331?) (C/N 1248/MRTT0178)
Operator - Cobham for the Royal Air Force (RAF) (Air Tanker) Squadron - N/a
Date and Location - 18/10 - Bournemouth International Airport (EGHH)

Further Information

The Airbus A330 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) is an aerial refuelling tanker aircraft based on the civilian Airbus A330-200. The A330 MRTT has been ordered by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), Royal Air Force (RAF), United Arab Emirates Air Force, and Royal Saudi Air Force. The A330 MRTT is a military derivative of the Airbus A330-200 airliner. It is designed as a dual-role air-to-air refuelling and transport aircraft. For air-to-air refuelling missions the A330 MRTT can be equipped with a combination of any of the following systems, Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft, Cobham 805E Fuselage Refuelling Unit (FRU) for probe-equipped receiver aircraft and the Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) for self in-flight refuelling. The RAF currently have 14 (7 x KC2, 5 x KC3 + 2 fitted for KC3) of the type on order to take over the Strategic Transport and Aerial Refueling Role from the services ageing TriStars and VC10s. . Based on the civilian Airbus A330-200, the A330 MRTT has been ordered by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), Royal Air Force (RAF), United Arab Emirates Air Force, and Royal Saudi Air Force. The EADS/Northrop Grumman KC-45 was a version of the A330 MRTT proposed for the United States Air Force. The UK Ministry of Defence signed a deal to lease 14 aircraft under a private finance initiative arrangement from EADS-led consortium AirTanker, with the first aircraft to enter service in 2012. There are two versions, designated Voyager KC2 and Voyager KC3 the former will be fitted with two Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods, the latter with a Cobham 805E Fuselage Refuelling Unit (FRU) in addition to the under-wing pods. None of the RAF aircraft will be fitted with the Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS). The fleet is to be based at RAF Brize Norton and will be powered by Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines. Crewed by 2 pilots and 1 AAR operator, the aircraft will have a range of 14,800 km and a ceiling height of 41,500 ft.

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Bizfreeq
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Bizfreeq
Aircraft - Beechcraft MC-12W 'Liberty'
Serial - 09-0624 (C/N FC-624)
09-0655 (C/N FC-655)
09-0684 (C/N FC-684)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 4th ERS
Date and Location - 20/10 - RAF Lakenheath (EGUL)

Further Information

The USAF Currently have some 37 (8 King Air 350s and 29 King Air 350ERs converted into MC variants) of the type in service in the Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) role. The MC-12W is a medium- to low-altitude, twin-engine turboprop aircraft. The primary mission is providing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, or ISR, support directly to ground forces. The MC-12W is a joint forces air component commander asset in support of the joint force commander. The MC-12W is not just an aircraft, but a complete collection, processing, analysis and dissemination system. The aircraft are military versions of the Hawker Beechcraft Super King Air 350 and Super King 350ER. A fully operational system consists of a modified aircraft with sensors, a ground exploitation cell, line-of-sight and satellite communications datalinks, along with a robust voice communications suite. The aircraft is equipped with an electro-optical infrared sensor and other sensors as the mission requires. The EO/IR sensor also includes a laser illuminator and designator in a single sensor package allowing MC-12 system to partake in worldwide operations. The MC-12 capability supports all aspects of the Air Force Irregular Warfare mission (counter insurgency, foreign internal defense and building partnership capacity). Medium- to low-altitude ISR is a core mission for the Air Force. The first MC-12 arrived at Key Field in Meridian, Miss., April 28, 2009 and flew its first combat support sortie on June 12, 2009. With a unique mission to execute, members of the 4th ERS are eager to "look for trouble," as their squadron motto states, but hope to see it first so U.S. and coalition ground forces can avoid it. The first of its kind for the Air Force in Afghanistan, the MC-12 provides real-time ISR in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. The aircraft bring another capability to Operation Enduring Freedom because the MC-12 is not just an aircraft, but a complete collection, processing, analysis and dissemination system of Airmen committed to securing Afghanistan and protecting Afghan and coalition lives.

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Dinger
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Mild-03
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Ryan Dorling
Aircraft - Lockheed C130E Hercules
Serial - 73-0991 (C/N 382-4524)
Operator - Turkish Air Force (Türk Hava Kuvvetleri) Squadron - 222 'Alev (Flame)' Filo
Date and Location - 16/10 - RAF Mildenhall (EGUN)

Further Information

The Turkish Air Force currently have 13 C130s in service consisting of a mixture of both B and E versions, all of which have been modernized by TAI under the 'Erciyes' program. This particular example comes from from 222 Filo (Alev/Flame) based at Kayseri/Erkilet, which is the home to the 12nciHUAU transport wing. The Wing is made up of 3 Squadrons (221 Filo Esen/Brise with the C160D Transall, 222 Filo Alev/Flame with the C130b/E and 223 Filo (WFU) Kanat/wing with the CN325M-100). The TuAF are due to replace some of their older C130 Airframes and augment the remaining ones with the A400M. Turkey is also a partner nation in the Airbus A400M program. Although the A400M is essentially a heavy tactical lift aircraft, it can also be transformed into a tanker aircraft for aerial refueling at short notice and has ordered a total of ten of the type. 222 have operrated the type since 1964 and currently operate all 13 of the aircraft including the Turkish Stars Support Aircraft. The TUAF has been using 6 C-130B since 1981 and 7 C-130E since 1961 for personnel carrier, fire extinguishing, and cargo. C-130s have been used for channel missions that 2 are programmed two times a week in order to carry the material shipments between the Turkish borders, and to carry materials overseas because of its ability to go further than the other airlift aircraft in the TuAF, the C-160s and CN-235s.

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Billydog
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BP2324
Aircraft - Antonov AN30B (NATO reporting name: Clank)
Serial - 87 BLACK (C/N - 0807)
Operator - Russian Air Force (Russian: Военно-воздушные cилы России, tr. Voyenno-vozdushnye sily Rossii) Squadron - Open Skies
Date and Location - 18/10 - Oslo Airport - Gardermoen (ENGM)

Further Information

The Treaty on Open Skies entered into force on January 1, 2002, and currently has 34 States Parties. It establishes a program of unarmed aerial surveillance flights over the entire territory of its participants. The treaty is designed to enhance mutual understanding and confidence by giving all participants, regardless of size, a direct role in gathering information about military forces and activities of concern to them. Open Skies is one of the most wide-ranging international efforts to date promoting openness and transparency of military forces and activities. The concept of "mutual aerial observation" was initially proposed to Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin at the Geneva Conference of 1955 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower; however, the Soviets promptly rejected the concept and it lay dormant for several years.[citation needed] The treaty was eventually signed as an initiative of US president (and former Director of Central Intelligence) George H. W. Bush in 1989. Negotiated by the then-members of NATO and the Warsaw Pact, the agreement was signed in Helsinki, Finland, on March 24, 1992. This treaty is not related to civil-aviation open skies agreements. The 34 State Parties to the Open Skies Treaty are: Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and United States. Kyrgyzstan has signed but not yet ratified. Canada and Hungary are the depositories of the treaty in recognition of their special contribution to the Open Skies process. "Depository" countries maintain treaty documents and provide administrative support. Observation aircraft may be provided by either the observing Party or (the "taxi option") by the observed Party, at the latter's choice. All Open Skies aircraft and sensors must pass specific certification and pre-flight inspection procedures to ensure that they are compliant with treaty standards. The AN30 is a development of the An-24 designed for aerial cartography and first flew on 21 August 1967. The Aircraft was introduced into service in July 1968 and 123 had been built between 1971-1980. Flown by a crew of 7, the B variant was designed for the Soviet Air Force. 26 built. Main differences from An-30A was the avionics fit. Most An-30Bs were retro-fitted with chaff/flare dispensers. As well as its principal use as a survey aircraft, it has also been used by Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Romania, Russia and Ukraine to carry out surveillance under the Open Skies Treaty.

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Fen
Aircraft - Hawker Hunter F58 'Miss Demeanour'
Serial - G-PSST (C/N HABL-003115))
Operator - Hawker Hunter Developments Owner - Johnathan 'Flapjack' Whaley
Date and Location - 15/10 - Mach Loop (Wales)

Further Information

Originally built for the Royal Air Force as a mark F.4 (XF947) in 1956. Built as part of the first production batch of F.4s, 947 was first delivered to No.5 Maintenance Unit at Kemble before moving to join No.3(Fighter) Squadron at RAF Geilenkirchen, Germany, as part of 2 ATAF (Allied Tactical Air Force) in active service. After a short period the aircraft was re-allocated to 229 Operational Conversion Unit at RAF Chivenor until the end of her RAF service period. With a career with the RAF over, she was transferred to the Fleet Air Arm at Arbroath to become a Ground Instructional Airframe (number A2568) before being classed surplus to requirements and placed up for disposal. At this point she was purchased by Hawker Siddeley Aviation in 1971 as G-9-317 for conversion to a Mk58A as part of a contract for the Swiss Air Force. Re-serialled as J-4104, she was delivered to the Swiss Air Force on 2nd February 1972 and spent most of her remaining military career as a target tug carrying the Swedish MBV-2S winch, usually carried under the starboard wing. In 1996 J-4104 was retired from military service for a second time and was sold to a private owner and ferried to the British Aerospace airfield at Dunsfold. The aircraft had a total of just 1659 hours on the airframe! In 1997 she was acquired by Jonathon Whaley’s company, Heritage Aviation Developments Ltd and registered as G-PSST. The aircraft underwent restoration by Jet Heritage at Hurn Airport and was completed in mid-’98 and she was towed across the airfield to AIM Aviation for surface finishing at the end of the year. The unique thing about G-PSST is the spectacular paint scheme she is presented in. The work took four nerve wracking weeks, with most of the time spent flatting down coats of paint and masking up for the next colour. The actual spraying took less than 10% of the time! As Flapjack says - it’s not a felony to paint a Hunter like this.... its just a Miss Demeanour!

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Flyingslug01
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Flyingslug01
Aircraft - Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet
Serial - AT08 (C/N B05/1018)
AT25 (C/N B25/1110)
Operator - Belgian Air Force (Belgian Air Component) Squadron - 11sm / AJetS
Date and Location - 19/03 Boscombe Down and RAF Lakenheath

Further Information -

The Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet is a light attack jet and advanced trainer aircraft co-manufactured by Dornier of Germany and Dassault-Breguet of France. The first major foreign customers were Belgium and Egypt, each performing final assembly of French-configuration Alpha Jet E machines. Belgium ordered 33 aircraft under the designation of Alpha Jet 1B, with assembly by SABCA of Belgium and deliveries in 1978–1980. The Belgian Air Component currently operate 29 of the type in the Jet Trainer Role and are based in FranceThe Belgian aircraft have been updated by SABCA to Alpha Jet 1B+ configuration, featuring a laser-gyro inertial navigation system with a GPS receiver, a HUD in the front cockpit and a HUD repeater in the rear, a video recorder and other small improvements. The initial 1B+ was redelivered in 2000 and the Alpha Jets are expected to remain in Belgian service until at least 2015. Operated by 11e Escadrille/11de Smaldeel with 11sm/AJetS based at Cazaux in France. It is incorporated into ETO 02.008 with 29 Alpha Jet 1B+ and is part of the French-Belgian Alpha Jet School (AJetS) The Belgian Air Force's entire Alpha Jet fleet is based with the unit and are used in the Jet Trainer Role. Both the French and the Belginas have worked in collaberation for Jet Plot Training since 2005 and will remain the advanced trainer for the BDAC until atleast 2015, although there are currently no plans for a replacement. Ordered in September 1972 as a replacement for the T33 and Fouga Magister the last was delivered in 1980. The Aircraft were where assembled by Société Anonyme Belge de Constructions Aéronautiques (SABCA).

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Cheesy
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Cheesy
Thats all for this week! Sorry there a day late - I managed to delete them before posting last night! :grr: :blush:

Enjoy!
Cheers

Boo boo (aka Jamie)

'The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down!' - Yeager

Headancer
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:43 am

Re: 14/10 - 21/10 just too much

Post by Headancer » Wed Nov 21, 2012 10:19 pm

Is there any chance we could return to just posting a few snaps in same week regarding what is out and about?

Part of the attraction of the site was seeing what was current etc

...but a month makes the whole premise somewhat stale.

The text is fantastic , it truly is, dare I say brilliant but I suspect the work rate has crept up, the burden on the writer has found it
difficult , infact impossible to maintain, there is simply too much work.

Flyingmonster
Administrator
Posts: 13589
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: Skipton, North Yorkshire

Re: 14/10 - 21/10 just too much

Post by Flyingmonster » Wed Nov 21, 2012 11:50 pm

Headancer wrote:Is there any chance we could return to just posting a few snaps in same week regarding what is out and about?

Part of the attraction of the site was seeing what was current etc

...but a month makes the whole premise somewhat stale.

The text is fantastic , it truly is, dare I say brilliant but I suspect the work rate has crept up, the burden on the writer has found it
difficult , infact impossible to maintain, there is simply too much work.
Headdancer - First of all apologies for the fact ive let the Highlights slip :blush:

Compiling the Highlights has been of great enjoyment to myself and I have learnt a huge deal! I have in fact started to compile the Highlights for this week already to get them back on track.

So as of Sunday we will have the Highlights back to what I hope is the same standard they have been!

Many Thanks

Monster :thumb:
Cheers

Boo boo (aka Jamie)

'The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down!' - Yeager

Headancer
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:43 am

Re: 14/10 - 21/10

Post by Headancer » Thu Nov 22, 2012 1:04 pm

Super job , even better :clap:

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