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20/08 - 26/08

A weekly feature bringing you the highlights of any interesting or unusual photos/movements from the week just gone.
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Flyingmonster
Administrator
Posts: 13588
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: Skipton, North Yorkshire

20/08 - 26/08

Post by Flyingmonster » Fri Aug 31, 2012 12:29 pm

This Weeks Highlights
20/08 - 26/08

Aircraft - Fairchild Republic A-10A Thunderbolt II
Serial - 81-0654/SP (C/N A10-0702)
81-0983/SP (C/N A10-0678)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 52nd Wing/81st Fighter Squadron
Date and Location - 22/08 - RAF Lakenheath (EGUL)

Further Information

The Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II is an American single-seat, twin-engine, straight-wing jet aircraft developed by Fairchild-Republic in the early 1970s. The A-10 was designed for a United States Air Force requirement to provide close air support (CAS) for ground forces by attacking tanks, armored vehicles, and other ground targets with a limited air interdiction capability. It is the first U.S. Air Force aircraft designed solely for close air support. Designed around the GAU-8 Avenger, a heavy rotary cannon which forms the aircraft's primary armament (and is, to date, the heaviest rotary cannon ever mounted on an aircraft). The A-10's official name comes from the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt of World War II, a fighter that was particularly effective at close air support. The A-10 is more commonly known by its nickname "Warthog" or simply "Hog". The A-10 is not expected to be replaced until 2028 or later. The A-10 is exceptionally tough. Its strong airframe can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high-explosive projectiles up to 23 mm. The aircraft has triple redundancy in its flight systems, with mechanical systems to back up double-redundant hydraulic systems. This permits pilots to fly and land when hydraulic power or part of a wing is lost. Proof of the durability of the A-10 was shown when Captain Kim Campbell, flying a ground support mission over Baghdad during the 2003 invasion of Iraq on 7 April, suffered extensive flak damage to her A-10. Iraqi fire damaged one of the A-10's engines and crippled its hydraulic system, which required the aircraft's stabilizer and flight controls to be operated via the back-up mechanical system, this being known as 'manual reversion mode'. Despite this damage, Campbell managed to fly the aircraft for nearly an hour and landed safely. Flown by a crew of 1, the aircraft has a Max takeoff weight of 50,000 lb and a ranged of some 2,240 nmi. The Type has been used extensively by the USAF (The Sole operator of the type) in the Gulf War, Balkans, Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. The A-10 was used in combat for the first time during the Gulf War in 1991, destroying more than 900 Iraqi tanks, 2,000 military vehicles, and 1,200 artillery pieces. A-10s shot down two Iraqi helicopters with the GAU-8 cannon. The first of these was an Iraqi helicopter shot down by Captain Robert Swain over Kuwait on 6 February 1991, marking the A-10's first air-to-air victory. The 81st Fighter Squadron (81 FS) is part of the 52d Fighter Wing at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. It operates the A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft conducting close air support missions. The Unit have been operating the type since 1994.

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Stigorige
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Stigorige
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Nigelblake
Aircraft - BAE Systems Hawk 102D (LIFT)
Serial - ZJ100 (C/N 359/312359)
Operator - BAE Systems (Warton) Squadron - ASTRAEA programme
Date and Location - 22/08 - BAE Warton (EGNO)

Further Information

A development of the Hawk Mk100 (A two-seat advanced weapons trainer with additional avionics, an optional forward looking infrared, a redesigned wing and HOTAS), the aircraft features a new wing, forward and centre fuselage, fin and tailplane. The aircraft have only 10% commonality with the existing first generation aircraft and have four times the fatigue life of the original aircraft. The engine, powering the Hawk LIFT is a Rolls Royce/Turbomeca Adour Mark 951 engine, which is a newly developed upgrade from the Adour 871, which introduces full authority digital engine control (FADEC), care free handling and a maximum thrust output of 6 500 lbs. The power to weight ratio and good sustained turn rates provide an ideal flight envelope and performance domain to step from a Jet Trainer to a front-line type. The aircraft features a highly sophisticated Avionics Suite that helps with the ideal handling characteristics for fighter training. The type is capable of demonstrating supersonic flight in a dive. The aircraft is further enhanced by a simulated radar, multi-functional displays and hands-on throttle and stick (HOTAS). External fuel tanks and an air refuelling capability can enhance the range of the aircraft. The aircraft is was selected by the South African Air Force in December 1999 as a Lead In Fighter Trainer and 24 of the type are currently in service with 85 Combat Flying School at AFB Makhado. The Aircraft, used as a Demonstator, is now part of the ASTRAEA programme at Warton. The aim of the ASTRAEA programme is to enable the routine use of UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) in all classes of airspace without the need for restrictive or specialised conditions of operation. ASTRAEA (Autonomous Systems Technology Related Airborne Evaluation & Assessment) is a UK industry-led consortium focusing on the technologies, systems, facilities, procedures and regulations that will allow autonomous vehicles to operate safely and routinely in civil airspace over the United Kingdom. The £62 million effort is led by an impressive consortium of seven companies: AOS, BAE Systems, Cassidian, Cobham, QinetiQ, Rolls-Royce and Thales. The programme consists of two separate projects: Separation Assurance & Control and Autonomy & Decision Making.

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Trembler1
Aircraft - Lockheed Martin C130J-30 Hercules 'IDUNN'
Serial - 5607 (C/N 382-5607)
Operator - Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) (Norwegian: Luftforsvaret) Squadron - 335 Squadron
Date and Location - 26/08 - Glasgow International Airport (EGPF)

Further Information

The Aircraft is one of 3 the Norwegians have in the Tactical Transport role at Gardermoen Air Station. The Aircraft are operated under the 135 Air Wing and used by 335 Squadron. The 3 aircraft are named Frigg, Idunn and Nanna and replace the Six C130H's the Norwegians used to have named Odin, Tor, Frøy, Balder, Ty and Brage. The Lockheed Martin C-130J "Super" Hercules is a four-engine turboprop military transport aircraft. The C-130J is a comprehensive update of the venerable Lockheed C-130 Hercules, with new engines, flight deck, and other systems. The Hercules family has the longest continuous production run of any military aircraft in history. During more than 50 years of service, the family has participated in military, civilian, and humanitarian aid operations. Changes made have improved performance over its C-130E/H predecessors, such as 40% greater range, 21% higher maximum speed, and 41% shorter takeoff distance. The J-model is available in a standard-length or stretched -30 variant. Fifteen nations have placed orders for a total of 300 C-130Js, of which 250 aircraft have been delivered as of February 2012. 4 aircraft were delivered between November 2008 and June 2010 as replacement for six C-130E/H. In 2012, the force ordered 2 more C-130J-30's to increase the fleet and replace one that was sadly lost in a crash on Mountain Kebnekaise during Cold Response 2012. The service has used the C-130J for Operations in areas such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Lithuania and Afghanistan in support of both Norwegian and NATO forces. The aircraft can also support special forces in dropping them off in possible areas of operation. This also includes counter-terrorist operations if required. Since 1969, 335 Squadron personnel have been operating C-130 Hercules and was formed in 1941. The squadron is located at Gardermoen Air Station, but the Parliament has decided that Hercules aircraft be moved to Rygge.

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Duran212

Aircraft - Airbus CC-150 Polaris
Serial - 15003 (C/n 425)
Operator - Royal Canadian Air Force (Aviation Royale Canadienne) Squadron - 437 Squadron
Date and Location - 25/08 - Edinbrugh International Airport (EGPH)

Further Information -

The Airbus CC-150 Polaris is the designation for the civilian Airbus A310-300s which have been converted for use as the primary long distance transport aircraft for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Royal Canadian Air force CC-150s are currently operated by 437 Squadron based at CFB Trenton in Ontario. The RCAF have 5, 2 aerial refueling tankers/strategic airliftersof the type in service, which is a modified version of the Airbus A310. Three are configured for personnel and materiel transport, while two were reconfigured into the aerial refuelling role. Two of the five CC-150s have been converted to air-to-air refueling tankers for the CF-18 fleet as CC-150Ts. This was a capability that was lost when the CC-137s were retired. The conversion is part of the Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) program. The MRTT program was initiated because of a German Air Force (Luftwaffe) requirement and provided a cost effective solution for the CF. The Role of the RCAF is "To generate and maintain combat capable, multi-purpose, air forces to meet Canada's defence objectives." which it does with a force of some 14,500 personnel. Two CC-150T air-to-air refueling tankers were deployed to support Canadian CF-188 fighter jets that enforce the no-fly zone over Libya under Operation Odyssey Dawn and Operation Unified Protector. The CC-150 replaced the Boeing CC-137 (converted Boeing 707) in 1997 and are still maintained by Air Canada. Flown by a crew of two, the aircraft has a Capacity for 194 passengers and a range of some 9,600 km. The type is powered by 2 × General Electric CF6-80C2A2 high bypass turbofan engines, both producing 220 kN (50,000 lbf) of thrust each allowing a maximum speed of some Mach 0.84.

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The EDI Guy

Aircraft - PZL M28-05 Skytruck
Serial -
09-0317 (C/N AJE003-17)
11-0329 (C/N AJE003-20)
Operator - United States Air Force (USAF) Squadron - 27SOW/318SOS
Date and Location - 25/08 Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information

10 of the type are in US Service with the SOCOM (Special Operations Command) but are operated by U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command (a component of SOCOM) will operate the aircraft. The PZL M28 Skytruck (Westernised Version of the AN28) is a Polish STOL light cargo and passenger plane, produced by PZL Mielec, as a development of licence-built Antonov An-28. Powered by two US-built Pratt & Whitney PT-6 turboprop engines each generating about 1,100 horsepower, the aircraft are operated by the 318th Special Operations Squadron based at Cannon Air Force Base. The M28 is equipped with a large door on the rear of the aircraft that facilitate's quick loading and off-loading in the field as well as parachute jumpers. The aircraft are capable of carrying up to 18 passengers or three tons of cargo. The 15 ton M-28 is priced at about half that of a comparable Western aircraft. The M-28 can cruise at 270 kilometers an hour for about five hours per sortie. The US have been operating the type in service since June 2009 and have been seen in use in both Iraq and Afghanistan. The M28 has been exported to the US, Nepal, Colombia, Venezuela, Vietnam and Indonesia and is flown with a crew of 3. The aircraft is installed with an improved Honeywell avionics suite for VFR / IFR day and night and all weather operations. The PZL M28 Skytruck, completed its maiden flight on 24 July 1993. The limited production delivered 39 aircraft for export markets by 2006.

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Watson
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Watson

Aircraft - Boeing E3D Sentry AEW1 'Dopey'
Serial - ZH102 (C/N 24110/996)
Operator - Royal Air Force (RAF) Squadron - 8 Squadron
Date and Location - 23/08 - Prestwick International Airport (EGPK)

Further Information

The RAF has 7 E3Ds on strength in the Airborne Early Warning and Control role. Operated by 8 Squadron, the aircraft make up part of the NATO E3D Element. AWACS’s are used by the United States Air Force (USAF),NATO, Royal Air Force (RAF), French Air Force (FAF) and Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) utilising the 68 aircraft that were built. The aircraft are designated Sentry AEW.1 and are powered by CFM56 engines. The Boeing E-3 Sentry is an airborne early warning and control (AWACS) developed by Boeing as the prime contractor. Derived from the Boeing 707, it provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications.The E-3 is distinguished by the distinctive rotating radar dome above the fuselage. Production ended in 1992 after 68 aircraft were built. The British requirement came about following the cancellation of the British Aerospace Nimrod AEW3 project to replace the Avro Shackleton AEW2 during the 1980s. The UK E-3 order was placed in February 1987, with deliveries starting in 1990 to RAF Waddington. NATO acquired 18 E-3As and support equipment for a NATO air defense force. Since all aircraft must be registered with a certain country, the decision was made to register the 18 NATO Sentries with Luxembourg, a NATO member that previously did not have any air force. The eighteen E-3s were operated by Number 1, 2 and 3 Squadrons of NATO's E-3 Component, based at NATO Air Base Geilenkirchen. Presently 17 NATO E-3As are in the inventory, since one E-3 was lost in a accident. These aircraft make up the 1st part of a Global E3 Force and the French and British making up the 2nd part with there total of 11 aircraft. E-3 Sentry aircraft were among the first to deploy during Operation Desert Shield, where they immediately established as an around-the-clock radar screen to defend against Iraqi forces. During Operation Desert Storm, E-3s flew 379 missions and logged 5,052 hours of on-station time. E-3 controllers assisted in 38 of the 41 air-to-air kills recorded during the conflict. NATO and RAF E-3s also participated in the international military operation in Libya.

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Watson
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Daveayr

Aircraft - Dornier (RUAG Aerospace) Do-228LM (New Generation)
Serial - 98+35 (C/N 8302)
Operator - German Navy (Marineflieger) Squadron -
Date and Location - 23/08 - Newquay Cornwall Airport (EGHQ)

Further Information

One of 2 used by the German Navy in the Pollution control role based with Marinefliegergeschwader 3 'Graf Zeppelin' at Nordholz Air Base. The Dornier 228 LM is a modern twin-turboprop STOL utility aircraft still in production today and first introduced into operation worldwide in 1982. The Dornier 228 NG was produced by RUAG Aviation and was certified by EASA on 18 August 2010. The main changes from the previous Dornier 228-212 model are a new 5-blade propeller made of composite material, more powerful engines and an advanced glass cockpit featuring electronic instrument displays. The aircraft is in use by various civilian operators and military operators including National Air Force of Angola, Royal Thai Navy and both the Indian Navy and Air Force. The Aircraft are used for monitoring maritime security against marine pollution on behalf of the Ministry of Transport for the CCME based in Cuxhaven. Both Aircraft are eqquiped with Special devices such as radar, infrared and ultraviolet sensors, microwave radiometers and fluorescence lasers as well as video cameras. If a contamination is discovered during a flight, Data is transferred via direct line to be forwarded immediately to the CCME. From there, the next steps will be coordinated with the partners in the Maritime Security Centre. Operated by a crew of 3, the aircraft is powered by 2 × Garrett AiResearch TPE-331-5-252D and has a range of some 1,111 km. Marinefliegergeschwader 3 currently operates a mix of Lockheed P-3C Orions, Breguet Atlantics, Westland Sea Lynx and the Dornier Do.228LM. Some 2,000 civilian and military personnel are based at Nordholz, with the wing providing surveillance & reconnaissance, anti-submarine search, SAR, pollution control and Signal Intelligence (SIGINT) operations.

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Phat01

Aircraft - Embraer ERJ-135LR
Serial - CE-01 (C/N 145449)
Operator - Belgian Air Force (BAC) Squadron - 21sm
Date and Location - 22/08 - Glasgow International Airport (EGPF)

Further Information

The BAC currently operate 2 of the type in the VIP Role. The type, a Embraer ERJ-135LR, is a upgraded version of the basic 135 with a increased fuel capacity (5187 kg) and upgraded engines (Rolls-Royce AE 3007-A1). The Rolls Royce AE 3007A1 engines provide 15% more power and are flat rated at 33.1 kN (7440 lb) thrust to provide improved climb characteristics and improved cruise performance in high ambient temperatures. The BAC have been operating two ERJ 135 and two ERJ 145 since 2001 and have been used to transport VIP's all over the world since then. The type is operated by a crew of 2 and has a capacity of some 37 passengers. First flown on August 11, 1995, the type was introduced into service worldwide in December 1996 and is still in production today. The Squadron (21 Sqn Flight Liaison & Long Haul Sioux Rouge/Rode Sioux) comes under the command of the 15th Wing and shares its aircraft with the Ops & Training Squadron, who are responsible for training pilots on the C-130H, A330-300, ERJ-135, ERJ-145, Falcon 20E and Falcon 900B. The wing comprises two operational squadrons, the 21st Squadron and the 20th Squadron, and a Training & Conversion Unit.

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Duran212

Aircraft - Raytheon Sentinel R1
Serial - ZJ693 (C/N 9132)
Operator - Royal Air Force (RAF) Squadron - 5 (AC) Squadron
Date and Location - 22/08 - Glasgow International Airport (EGPF)

Further Information

The aircraft is one of 5 on strength with the RAF in Battlefield surveillance (ISTAR) Role with 5 (AC) Squadron. The Aircraft is a Bombardier Global Express jet, modified as an airborne battlefield and ground surveillance platform and is interoperable with other allied systems such as JSTARS and the NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) system. Powered by two Rolls-Royce Deutschland BR710 turbofan engines, the programme involved five aircraft and eight mobile ground stations (six on wheeled all terrain vehicles and two in air transportable containers), and a training facility at RAF Waddington. The first flight of the modified prototype was in August 2001, which validated the modifications required for the ASTOR system. The first production Sentinel R1 made its 4.4 hour maiden flight on 26 May 2004. The aircraft entered operational service with V (Army Co-operation) Squadron and flew its first operational sortie in Afghanistan in February 2009. The Sentinel cockpit has a centrally housed, pull-down screen capable of displaying a moving map, Link 16 datalink information and defensive aids subsystem (DASS) data. The DASS comprises a towed radar decoy, missile approach warning system and chaff and flare dispensers and can be operated in automatic, semi-automatic or manual mode. It is crewed by a pilot, a co-pilot, an Airborne Mission Commander (AMC) and two image analysts. Mission endurance are around about nine hours. While the image analysts can analyse the images on board the aircraft it is expected that, unlike the JSTARS, the actual battle management will occur on the ground. 5 Squadron was formed on 26 July 1913 at Farnborough and have been operating the R1 since 1 December 2008.

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Duran212



Thats all for this week! :thumb:
Cheers

Boo boo (aka Jamie)

'The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down!' - Yeager

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Chris Melaisi
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Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:32 pm
Location: Edinburgh
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Re: 20/08 - 26/08

Post by Chris Melaisi » Fri Aug 31, 2012 12:39 pm

Nice Jamie! But my Polaris shot was at Edinburgh (EDI)!! :thumbs:

Thanks, Chris! :D
My Flickr Photos.

My Airliners.net Photos.

Flyingmonster
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Posts: 13588
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: Skipton, North Yorkshire

Re: 20/08 - 26/08

Post by Flyingmonster » Fri Aug 31, 2012 12:46 pm

Cheer Chris! Duly changed! Seems you guys in Scotland have had a lot of Mil action lately! Long may it continue!
Cheers

Boo boo (aka Jamie)

'The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down!' - Yeager

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