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Rechlin-Larz airfield

Warbirds, Replicas and Nostalgic photos in here please.

Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:13 pm

Lärz, 1953 -1962.
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MiG-17F (Fresco-C)
Basic fighter version powered by VK-1F engine with afterburner ("aircraft SF").

The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 (NATO reporting name: Fresco) (China:Shenyang J-5) (Poland: PZL-Mielec Lim-6) is a high-subsonic fighter aircraft produced in the USSR from 1952 and operated by numerous air forces in many variants. Most MiG-17 variants cannot carry air-to-air missiles, but shot down many aircraft with its cannons. It is an advanced development of the very similar appearing MiG-15 of the Korean War, and was used as an effective threat against supersonic fighters of the United States in the Vietnam War. It was also briefly known as the "Type 38", by USAF designation prior to the development of NATO codes.

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The pilot Demian Kolodjazgny in Larz.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Tue May 22, 2012 6:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:08 pm

The history of the combat path of the oldest active Russian aviation regiment begins on January 17, 1940 when the 145.IAP was formed in the village of Kayralo (formerly Finnish territory). Major V. N. Stoff was designated as the first commander. Personnel from the first and second squadrons of the 138.IAP (flying I-15bis fighters), the first squadron of the 20.IAP (I-16), as well as pilots from the 48.IAP and the 80.IAP (without their aircraft) became the foundation for the newly formed aviation unit. In accordance with 9th Army Military Air Forces (VVS) Order N°6 dated January 1, 1940 this concluded the formation of the 145th IAP. Subsequently, it was redeployed on March 24, 1940 to its permanent duty station at Shonguy Airfield in Murmansk Oblast’ and became part of the 14th Army VVS 27th Aviation Brigade.

Source here:
http://www.airforce.ru/history/modern/19giap/19giap.htm

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Last edited by Rechlinman on Tue May 22, 2012 7:09 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:09 pm

Bell P-39 Airacobra

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The Bell P-39 Airacobra was one of the principal American fighter aircraft in service at the start of World War II. It was the first fighter in history with a tricycle undercarriage and the first to have the engine installed in the center fuselage, behind the pilot. Although its mid-engine placement was innovative, the P-39 design was handicapped by the lack of an efficient turbo-supercharger, limiting it to low-altitude work. The P-39 was used with great success by the Soviet Air Force, who scored the highest number of individual kills attributed to any U.S. fighter type. Other important users were the Free French and co-belligerent Italian air forces. Together with the derivative P-63 Kingcobra, these aircraft became the most successful mass-produced fixed-wing aircraft manufactured by Bell.

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Almost all complaints centered on the Allison V-1710 engine that often overheated, and it malfunctioned when landing and often in combat. The oil was not rated for the Russian winters so the lubricant thickened in the cold. There were cases of failures of the driveshaft connecting the engine to the propeller in the cold. Some engine problems were able to be corrected through engine modernizations that Allison made at the recommendations of Soviet engineers. The Russians quickly noticed the tendency of the Airacobra to eagerly go into a flat stall. Since no technical fix to that problem existed (nor was the Bell Company able to avoid the flat stall in the more modern Kingcobra), pilots were taught to avoid dangerous flight modes. Nonetheless, several Soviet test pilots and front pilots crashed in stalled Cobras.
The 19th GvIAP returned to the front on May 15, 1942 under the command of Major G. A. Reyfshneyder. The unit included twenty-two pilots and the aircraft inventory was sixteen Airacobra 1 and ten P-40E. By the evening of May 15 the regiment’s pilots already had flown a combat sortie in which four Airacobras intercepted a group of twelve Bf 109 and eight twin-engine Bf 110 over Lake Tulp-Yarv. During the subsequent aerial combat, Captain Kutakhov and Senior Lieutenant Bochkov each shot down an enemy aircraft. These were the initial victories by the Soviet Military Air Forces flying the Airacobra.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Tue May 22, 2012 7:22 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:10 pm

The emotions of Soviet pilots regarding the armament of the Airacobra were more contradictory. Pilots preferred the 20 mm automatic cannon, considering the Browning 7.7 mm machine guns insufficiently effective, useful only to inflict damage on German aircraft, but not able to destroy them. The wing-mounted machine guns often were removed. The reduction in aircraft weight increased its maneuvering capabilities, while the pilots did not think removal of two machine guns of rifle caliber was a great sacrifice (the Aircobra 1 was armed with a 20 mm canon and two .50 machine guns in the nose, as well as four .30 machine guns in the wings). The airmen liked very much the later P-39Q Airacobra version that included a 37 mm cannon and four .50 machine guns - two in the nose and two under the wings in gondolas. According to Soviet standards, a fighter had to have one cannon and two large-caliber machineguns. The P-39Q even exceeded this requirement. The wing-mounted machine gun containers were most often removed from the P-39Q to lighten the aircraft. The consideration was that the firepower remaining after removal of the machine guns entirely sufficed. Soviet pilots considered the Airacobra a maneuvering fighter that did not cede anything to the enemy either in the verticals or in the horizontal. The evaluation differed strikingly from that of American pilots. It was a case where the Americans did not like the conduct of the Airacobra primarily at high altitudes at a time when most of the aerial combat on the Soviet-German front took place near the ground or at medium altitudes. At the same time, the Russians found several deficiencies in the American aircraft.

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P-40 Warhawk Tomahawk \ Kittyhawk

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The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk was an American single-engine, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. It was used by the air forces of 28 nations, including those of most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in front line service until the end of the war. It was the third most produced American fighter ever, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation's main production facility at Buffalo, New York.
The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36; this reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service.
Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the United States for all P-40s. The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the P-40B and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.
The P-40's lack of a two-stage supercharger made it inferior to Luftwaffe fighters such as the Messerschmitt Bf 109 or the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 in high altitude combat and it was rarely used in operations in Northwest Europe. Between 1941 and 1944, however, the P-40 played a critical role with Allied air forces in three major theaters: North Africa, the Southwest Pacific and China. It also had a significant role in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, Alaska and Italy. The P-40's high altitude performance was not as critical in those theaters, where it served as an air supremacy fighter, bomber escort and fighter bomber.
P-40s first saw combat with the British Commonwealth squadrons of the Desert Air Force (DAF) in the Middle East and North African campaigns, during June 1941. The Royal Air Force's No. 112 Squadron was among the first to operate Tomahawks, in North Africa, and the unit was the first to feature the "shark mouth" logo, copying similar markings on some Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engine fighters.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Tue May 22, 2012 7:16 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:39 am

Standard tactical nuclear bomb by the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union was the RN-40.

Larz. "Granit" - storehouse of 38 tactical nuclear bombs RN-28 and RN-40 (8U-64) : Weight of this bobm - 250 kg. Yield - 30 Kt.

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Last edited by Rechlinman on Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby brewerybod » Sun Mar 13, 2011 8:08 pm

Great photos........thank you for posting them :clap:
Bentwaters Cold War Museum, Suffolk
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby urkles » Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:50 am

Re-iterate that Rechlinman, great story and photos, some good research there dude!
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:05 pm

Rechlinman wrote:Standard tactical nuclear bomb by the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union was the RN-40.

Larz. Storehouse of 38 tactical nuclear bombs RN-28 and RN-40 (8U-64) : Weight of this bobm - 250 kg. Yield - 30 Kt.


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RN-28.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Mon Mar 28, 2011 5:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby ndfilter » Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:19 pm

Thanks Richlinman, one of my favourite sets of pictures ever!!! I never get tired of seeing what went on behind the iron curtain
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Location: Shepperton, Middlesex

Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:05 pm

ndfilter wrote:Thanks Richlinman, one of my favourite sets of pictures ever!!! I never get tired of seeing what went on behind the iron curtain



All these data gather with objective of construction of virtual garrison Rechlin.
I shall invite you in this seat by means of the Internet when the image becomes photo-realistic.

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Last edited by Rechlinman on Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:45 am

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The lost symbols of the Soviet epoch. Rechlin, 1980.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:51 am

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Garrison Rechlin. 1980.
Google SketchUp visualisation.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Thu Mar 31, 2011 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:57 am

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Garrison Larz. 1985.
Simple version.

These objects will be placed on a satellite map of planet by means of computer program Google Earth.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Thu May 02, 2013 12:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:32 am

Such type will have virtual garrison Larz.

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3D-MAX Visualization.
Last edited by Rechlinman on Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:50 am

Last edited by Rechlinman on Thu May 02, 2013 12:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:42 am

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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:45 am

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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:46 am

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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:47 am

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Re: Rechlin-Larz airfield

Postby Rechlinman » Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:48 am

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